February 10, 2014
Mirror Mpls, 2013.
In-camera double-exposure on 4x5” film shot using an old Calumet CC-400 monorail view camera. This is a scan of an 8x10” silver gelatin print.

Mirror Mpls, 2013.

In-camera double-exposure on 4x5” film shot using an old Calumet CC-400 monorail view camera. This is a scan of an 8x10” silver gelatin print.

May 13, 2013
This is a photograph of a city, Minneapolis, in the daytime. on Flickr.Crown Graphic | 135mm f/4.7 Optar (wide open/titled) | Arista/Foma 100 (@80) | R60 filter | Grad ND filter | Rodinal (1:50)
Recently, I’ve been taking Highway 55 to downtown which takes you through a not-so-nice part of town that has some great vantage points of the skyline. I think it’s interesting to see the city with the industrial part of town in the foreground. Don’t get me wrong, the Stone Arch Bridge and all is a nice area, but you’ll run into about 500 other photographers there, aiming their cameras at the same place you are. This view (above) had always intrigued me as I drove by, so last weekend I decided to venture through the maze of road construction from my apartment in Longfellow to this spot, on a dead end of a road that runs parallel to Olson Memorial Highway (the other name for 55). I was standing in a field of spring-long grass and it was windy as hell. My camera tipped over once with the lens extended and everything, but thank goodness for cameras built like tanks. All I had to do was pick it up and re-level it and it was good to go. I suppose I’ll tire of this “tilting” business sooner or later; I mean, I can do it whenever I want on Instagram. But there’s something like the real thing (notice the swirl of the old, wide open, tilted lens in the bottom corners) that makes it special. The ability to isolate an important element (the skyline) in a scene while also noting its context (Industrial North Minneapolis) is the key to this technique. The 135mm lens is the equivalent of about a 40mm lens on a 35mm camera. It’s a pretty wide normal lens, so taking landscape shots like this can be difficult if you don’t have a way of isolating your subject, be it through a vignette, good light, or tilt (or all of the above).
All analog all day.

This is a photograph of a city, Minneapolis, in the daytime. on Flickr.

Crown Graphic | 135mm f/4.7 Optar (wide open/titled) | Arista/Foma 100 (@80) | R60 filter | Grad ND filter | Rodinal (1:50)

Recently, I’ve been taking Highway 55 to downtown which takes you through a not-so-nice part of town that has some great vantage points of the skyline. I think it’s interesting to see the city with the industrial part of town in the foreground. Don’t get me wrong, the Stone Arch Bridge and all is a nice area, but you’ll run into about 500 other photographers there, aiming their cameras at the same place you are. This view (above) had always intrigued me as I drove by, so last weekend I decided to venture through the maze of road construction from my apartment in Longfellow to this spot, on a dead end of a road that runs parallel to Olson Memorial Highway (the other name for 55). I was standing in a field of spring-long grass and it was windy as hell. My camera tipped over once with the lens extended and everything, but thank goodness for cameras built like tanks. All I had to do was pick it up and re-level it and it was good to go. I suppose I’ll tire of this “tilting” business sooner or later; I mean, I can do it whenever I want on Instagram. But there’s something like the real thing (notice the swirl of the old, wide open, tilted lens in the bottom corners) that makes it special. The ability to isolate an important element (the skyline) in a scene while also noting its context (Industrial North Minneapolis) is the key to this technique. The 135mm lens is the equivalent of about a 40mm lens on a 35mm camera. It’s a pretty wide normal lens, so taking landscape shots like this can be difficult if you don’t have a way of isolating your subject, be it through a vignette, good light, or tilt (or all of the above).

All analog all day.

May 8, 2013
“Mini”-apolis on Flickr.
Picture taking > Studying for finals;Puffy clouds > Overcast skies;Tilt > No tilt;Film > Digital.

“Mini”-apolis on Flickr.

Picture taking > Studying for finals;
Puffy clouds > Overcast skies;
Tilt > No tilt;
Film > Digital.

April 22, 2013
A larger view (camera) on Flickr.

A larger view (camera) on Flickr.

August 26, 2012
Dreamy, Plastic Minneapolis on Flickr.Holga 120N | Fuji Acros 100 | Rodinal (1:100) | Post in LR3
It’s fun to revisit and photograph places. You get to see what time does to a place. I haven’t been doing this long enough to notice any real changes in the Minneapolis skyline, but my previous photographs of the skyline from St. Anthony Main have all been very different than this last one. I love how the dreaminess of the plastic Holga lens combined with the long exposure softens this malleable scene. I only wish that the lightning that was surrounding me showed up in the background. Oh well, I’m sure I’ll be back here with a new setup and a fresh perspecive.

Dreamy, Plastic Minneapolis on Flickr.

Holga 120N | Fuji Acros 100 | Rodinal (1:100) | Post in LR3

It’s fun to revisit and photograph places. You get to see what time does to a place. I haven’t been doing this long enough to notice any real changes in the Minneapolis skyline, but my previous photographs of the skyline from St. Anthony Main have all been very different than this last one. I love how the dreaminess of the plastic Holga lens combined with the long exposure softens this malleable scene. I only wish that the lightning that was surrounding me showed up in the background. Oh well, I’m sure I’ll be back here with a new setup and a fresh perspecive.

May 19, 2012
Mount Minneapolis on Flickr.
If you happen to be in Northeast Minneapolis this weekend and are looking for something to do, come visit me at Art-A-Whirl! I’ll be at the Waterbury Building, 1121 Jackson NE, in suite #121.

Mount Minneapolis on Flickr.

If you happen to be in Northeast Minneapolis this weekend and are looking for something to do, come visit me at Art-A-Whirl! I’ll be at the Waterbury Building, 1121 Jackson NE, in suite #121.

May 7, 2012
Stuck Between Stations on Flickr.
Holga BC135 | Kodak Plus-x | XTOL (1:1) | post-processed in Topaz Adjust “The devil and John Berryman, they took a walk together and they ended up on Washington talking to the river | He said I surrounded myself with doctors and deep thinkers | But big heads and soft bodies make for lousy lovers | There was that night that we thought that John Berryman could fly | But he didn’t so he died” The Hold Steady’s “Stuck Between Stations” accurately names the Washington Avenue Bridge as the suicide location of the poet John Berryman, who jumped to his death from atop on January 7, 1972. It’s a famous landmark, not so much because of suicides, but because it connects the east and west sides of the University of Minnesota together. During the day, it’s filled with throngs of students on all forms of transportation. Luckily, for the winter months, it has a covered part that provides shelter from the Minnesota cold. This is a panorama shot in-camera on film using a 35mm Holga. Holgas are great because you can use the shutter at all times, it’s not coupled to the film winder. To create these imperfect (but that’s the appeal) images, you take a shot, wind about halfway, take another shot, wind halfway again, and take your final shot. You have to guess where each frame lands in relation to the previous one. It takes some trial and error, but I think you end up with some special images.

Stuck Between Stations on Flickr.

Holga BC135 | Kodak Plus-x | XTOL (1:1) | post-processed in Topaz Adjust

“The devil and John Berryman, they took a walk together and they ended up on Washington talking to the river | He said I surrounded myself with doctors and deep thinkers | But big heads and soft bodies make for lousy lovers | There was that night that we thought that John Berryman could fly | But he didn’t so he died”

The Hold Steady’s “Stuck Between Stations” accurately names the Washington Avenue Bridge as the suicide location of the poet John Berryman, who jumped to his death from atop on January 7, 1972. It’s a famous landmark, not so much because of suicides, but because it connects the east and west sides of the University of Minnesota together. During the day, it’s filled with throngs of students on all forms of transportation. Luckily, for the winter months, it has a covered part that provides shelter from the Minnesota cold.

This is a panorama shot in-camera on film using a 35mm Holga. Holgas are great because you can use the shutter at all times, it’s not coupled to the film winder. To create these imperfect (but that’s the appeal) images, you take a shot, wind about halfway, take another shot, wind halfway again, and take your final shot. You have to guess where each frame lands in relation to the previous one. It takes some trial and error, but I think you end up with some special images.

February 3, 2012
The Minneapolis City Skyline on Flickr.
It’s funny how taste changes, even in a short time. Earlier this fall, when I was just beginning to get into photography, I much preferred this to the look of the photo above. Both started as essentially the same shot, but I altered them in post processing. Even now, as I shoot more and more often on film (going as far as to return my 3-month old Rebel T3i (for a Fuji x10, as I would like a more portable digital option)), I process with the understanding that my tastes and, oh, if we’re feeling pretentious, my “artistic vision” will change in the coming weeks, months, years. And I’m ok with that. As long as I’m pushing myself to try new things and work on my technique, I consider that progress and each photo I publish here is just a marker of that evolution. I just hope that my future-self isn’t as enamored with garish HDR/tonemapping as my past self was…yeeesh.

The Minneapolis City Skyline on Flickr.

It’s funny how taste changes, even in a short time. Earlier this fall, when I was just beginning to get into photography, I much preferred this to the look of the photo above. Both started as essentially the same shot, but I altered them in post processing. Even now, as I shoot more and more often on film (going as far as to return my 3-month old Rebel T3i (for a Fuji x10, as I would like a more portable digital option)), I process with the understanding that my tastes and, oh, if we’re feeling pretentious, my “artistic vision” will change in the coming weeks, months, years. And I’m ok with that. As long as I’m pushing myself to try new things and work on my technique, I consider that progress and each photo I publish here is just a marker of that evolution. I just hope that my future-self isn’t as enamored with garish HDR/tonemapping as my past self was…yeeesh.

January 24, 2012
through the wire on Flickr.Welcome to A Brand New Minneapolis! I hope you enjoy the stay,
Joe

through the wire on Flickr.

Welcome to A Brand New Minneapolis! I hope you enjoy the stay,

Joe